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20110301
20110331
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Book TV 73
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 9:00am EST
the islamist threats confronting america. today, americans simply do not have what washington called the right understanding of the threats from the persian gulf region. in my writings i thought to acquaint americans with the nature of these threats. whether from iran in its a religion is in iraq and lebanon, the vicious martial anti-christian, anti-jewish and anti-western brand of islam is theology exporter under saudi arabia's official, or the forces of osama bin laden, al qaeda and other sunnis islamists lead and insight. and i also argued that the united states government under both parties is fighting an islamist enemy that does not exist. and, therefore, it is a policy that runs counter to america's historical traditions, and so to its best interests. official washington islamist enemy is the stuff of hollywood farce. beat a shia or sunni, the islamists are a limited band of fanatic nihilists, ready to kill widely and indiscriminately for the pure joy of murdering. and ready to sacrifice their lives because my daughters go to university, i went hold early presidential primaries every fou
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 1:15am EST
in america. i went back home at the end of the summer, and 10 years later, moved to new york. a couple years ago, my wife and i, i was out of graduate school, and we decided to spend some time in china, and here we are in beijing in one of these smoggy hazy rainy afternoons, and nothing to do other than stare at the very small television with one channel. we see a picture of this boy, and the picture was very clearly taken in the 19th century. the boy was clearly chinese, and the building to which next he was standing was clearly yale university. i thought to myself, i had no idea there were chinese students in yale university nonetheless in the 19th servelg ri. i started researching the story and discovered these remarkable young men of the story i will soon tell you. they wrote a lot of letters, kept journals, and when i read their journals and letters, i couldn't help but feel an immediate sense of tremendous, tremendous empathy. like them, i was from a different culture and came here to attend school and i felt i had to work really, really hard to understand what the culture was about an
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 9:00am EST
of thomas allen has written a new book fighting for the king and america's first civil war. who were the tories? >> people who didn't want to have independence from england. they started to talk. it was all political up until concord and lexington. and then there was a time when you could take the position being against the revolution and not get into too much trouble but wants the declaration of independence comes along you have two americas and the america that declared independence is fighting the americans who were not fighting. they allied themselves with british troops and former military units, 150 military units and they go and fight. uniforms and weapons, the holding. win the battles take place, the british who have a grand tradition of keeping a history of regiments kind of look with disdain on to these colonials they are fighting with and as a result you get a lot of british descriptions of battles but it is hard to find descriptions by the loyalists as they call themselves. when the war comes to an end and they have to tell the british commission on loyalists what they di
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 11:00am EST
teach for america go where did you teach, south bronx. and they show their teach for america tattoos. you are creating a kind of movement. the marine corps alumni represents a kind of movement represent ago certain attitude towards the world, you know -- >> this is exactly the idea. this is the big idea, you know? and teach for america isn't really about -- we are about teachers are critical but teach for america is about building a movement among our country's future leaders to say, we got to change the way our education system is, fundamentally. and i think your article in the new yorker about the formation of movements just captured the whole theory of teach for america and this is about the foundational experience about teaching successfully in ways that, you know, i think we're creating a corps of people who are absolutely determined to expand the opportunities facing kids in the most absolutely, you know, economically disadvantaged communities. you know, who are pouring themselves into their work and trying to put their kids on a different trajectory and, you know, having varyi
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 9:15pm EST
publishers including housing america and liberty nor safety are both outside publisher's. but we do both. >> thank you very much for your time. >> thank you so much. >> from new york city, liel leibovitz recounts the visit of 120 boys from china's qing empire to america in 1872. the boys and listed as members of the chinese educational mission were sent to the united states united states to learn the innovations of the last and return to china with new ideas. this is about 35 minutes. >> before i start to tell you the story of these remarkable men, i would like to tell a very short story of a far less remarkable man, myself. i was born in tel aviv, israel and when i was about 10 years old, and mother took me to spend the summer in a mysterious, exotic, faraway land filled with rich and splendid treasures. i'm talking of course about new jersey. and when i got to new jersey and attended summer camp for a couple of months, i made a bunch of startling discoveries. some discoveries were small, like the fact that previously believed to reside in fruit actually could come in a box or that ther
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 3:00pm EST
is in south america, but it's considered part of the caribbean, and they came to cut, to work on sugar plantations. so part of what fascinated us was what is this substance where someone in be his family -- in his family all the way in russia, a serf, and someone in my family looking to get a better life over here in india and then over to the caribbean, what is this substance that could effect people from such different parking lots of the world? -- parts of the world? >> and before we trace that out, we want to ask you a question. how many of you think you might have sugar somewhere in your family background? so that's one, two, three -- oh, man, yes! yes! >> all right. what i'm going to do, i just want to hear from a couple of you where your family might have been from, okay? >> well, i think my family might have been in the caribbean -- >> caribbean. >> okay, absolutely. >> okay, very good. okay? >> i feel my family was either in the caribbean or in europe. >> very good. >> okay, okay. >> i think my family was either in the caribbean or europe. >> okay. very good. anybody else here
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 8:15pm EST
flexibility. their 50 in america, 4999. that's remarkable. rod blagojevich did not sign on. he now wishes he had. had he done so, all these problems would've never happened for them. he was the only one who didn't. democrats and republicans signed on. we thought this out to be a slam dunk. we are presenting something that saves the federal government money. it's not a political issue, not partisan. mark warner night, when democrat one republican. the site to be simple. here, guys, we can save you several billion dollars. all we ask of you, let us governor medicaid problems a little bit more. not completely, a little bit more. and it was the biggest fight of ever been in. mark and i would look at each other and just shake our heads and they, what's wrong with these guys? they wanted to fight sites that we weren't even hounding. it can't be an important lesson that the further you wrote about from the shore, the more likely you are to be lost at sea. i'm convinced we've got a lot of folks in this city who are lost at sea. justice brandeis in 1932 and i quote him because i think it's an importa
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 9:00pm EST
to america were very on. six or seven years old. how was adaptation to america? >> i will answer the first question briefly. first of all, because adding 120 could 40 or 45 tremendously impressive men. the prime minister comment engineer, the diplomat convinced britain they are of many accomplishments. how did they survive this strenuous journey to america? talking about doing lead in the 19th century, here is how it fits. sitting around the dinner table if you want to beat you better know what you want to eat in english. if you do not know that you will not get it. they learn english very fast. [laughter] >> they were like 20 years buy the time they got to china, they were very young and have all the menial tasks. it took a good 10 years to come into their own as men. but they really did make a difference because they really were presented and what ever realm of life of the country they were being mining, engineering, telecom mining, engineering, telecommun, navy, brought a fresh spirit and self confident attitude that made a great change that by the way is what i see everywhere today in
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 6:30am EDT
of them, many of whom were for teach for america allows who were deeply determined to address what they viewed as the single most unconscionable crisis in our country. and who understood what you understand, especially after you've taught success in this context which is there isn't a silver bullet to this. that's not going to fix the problem for our kids. >> you had had a nucleus in place. the opportunity was katrina. that allowed an awful lot of change to happen in a very short period of time. i have no argument with that. you have an archive for that event? good. that's what we're talking the. we have these new quizzes overplays over to put them in place and lots of different cities, but it doesn't change the fact you can do an awful lot of good sometime by boeing it up. >> if we had real leadership right now in a lot of other places, determined to solve this problem comes if we viewed it as the crisis that is, and we have the right leadership in place, we would blow it up, to use your terminology, and lots of other context. >> i'm reminded, but i'm going to come back and ask yo
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 7:00pm EDT
atlanta a better city. georgia a better state, and america a better country. just how, i do not know but i have the faith to believe it will. and if i am right, then our suffering is not in vain. .. >> before we get started, i wanted to mention the upcoming events that includes james carroll on march 11 with his new book, and unger on april 4 more "american tempest: how the tea party sparked a revolution." others include billy collins and governor duvall patrick. you can find more information in the events flier. after the talk this afternoon, there's time for questions after which there's a book signing at the table, and you can get signed copies up at the registers. when you know you buy a book from the harvard bookstore, you're supporting a local institution who cares about books, and this author series would not be possible without that support. we are pleased to have c-span's here recording for book tv. if you have a question, wait for the microphone to come to you before asking your question. now is a good time to make sure you silenced your cell phones. this afternoon, i'm pleased t
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 12:00pm EST
can tell it is written by me. i am curious. how many teachable america alumni currently in the program are here? pretty amazing. first question. was there a time where american education was not in crisis? >> some -- >> you can just say yes if you want. >> no. i think we have had this issue -- i have limited historical knowledge myself but i am sure we have had these issues forever. we have been in denial about this particular issue that we are working to address. i think 20 years ago a lot of people were in denial about the very existence of what we call today educational inequity. >> security offices and police and less and less recess time, school menus that require a law degree to decipher with rule upon rules, longer school days, why would a child want to go to school? >> i think about the school's, talking about these transformational schools. kids are dying to be in school because first of all the principal and teachers love their kids and they build a community among them and the kids know that they will work incredibly hard but there is a huge pay off for that. i don't know th
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 12:00pm EDT
's, and the largest fireworks display ever seen in america. generations of new yorkers commemorated november 25th as evacuation day, an anniversary that of the folded into the more enduring november celebration of national togetherness, that is giving day. what if you had not wanted the british to leave? mixed in among a happy new york crowd there were other less cheerful faces. colonists who had sided with british, the departure spelled lawrie. during the war tens of thousands of loyalists had moved for safety into new york and of the british held cities. the british withdrawal raised urgent questions about their future. what kind of treatment could they expect? jailed, attacked, retain their property or hold on to their jobs? confronting real doubts of their lives, liberty, and potential for happiness in the united states, 60,000 loyalists decided to take their chances and follow the british elsewhere into the british empire. it took 16,000 black slaves with them bringing the total exodus to 75,000 people or about one in 40 members of the american population. it travel to canada, sell for brita
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 4:00pm EST
the idea. i mean, this is the big idea. teach for america really isn't about -- we are about, teachers are critical, but teach for america is about building a movement amount our country's future leaders to say we have to change the way our education system is fundamentally, and i think in your article in the new yorker about, about the formation of movements captured the whole theory of teach. it's the experience of teaching successfully in ways that, i know, i think we're creating a core of people who are absolutely determined to expand the opportunities facing kids in the most absolutely, you know, economically disadvantaged communities. you know, who are pouring themselves into their work and trying to put their kids on a different path and having varying levels of success and taking from that experience, incredible lesson. you know, they realize through their firsthand experience the challenges the kids face, the potential they have, and they realize it's ultimately possible to solve the problem, and that experience is not only important for their kids, but completely transformati
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 10:00am EST
] >> and dealing with america's terrorist enemies, i said that our tax dollars should pay for weapons to stop them, not lawyers to defend them. [applause] >> and you know what, the default position of the local machine is always to brush off political republican candidates who are running for office is as right wing nuts. well, this time it was different. it didn't fly in massachusetts. and under a short time before the final debate, i remember like it was yesterday, on a bitter cold night, as cold as it is here, this is tropical, come on. i shook hands, i actually went outside, it probably was, had to have been 10 or 20 below zero. it was cold. it was a cold night, but they were out there holding signs for each other. and i went outside and i shook hands with everybody, including those people who were supporting my opponent. they were mostly union guys and they would say scott, scott, we are voting for you. [laughter] >> yeah, we're here because we're getting paid to hold these signs. [laughter] >> we are voting for you, yes. well, that assure a confidence builder for the debate that i was having
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 12:00pm EST
'm the moderator for the panel, becoming america, immigration stories across the decades. . . so the student union. they will be available to sign books and the books are available at the signing venue. if you haven't already, can i ask you please to turn off your cell phones and pagers and i would like to introduce the authors. it is my great honor to introduce you to these four authors who enrich our knowing. raul castro's book "adversity is my angel: the life and career of raul h. castro" was co-written with jack audits junior. castro was born in mexico in 1916 the son of a copper miner and a midwife. is worked himself through school by plucking chickens, panning gold and waiting tables. in 1974 he made history when he was elected arizona's very first and to date only mexican-american governor. he will also answer to judge and ambassador. paula fass is a professor of history at the university of california berkeley. a distinguished scholar and resident at rutgers university, shea specializes in the history of children and childhood. in her seventh book, "inheriting the holocaust: a second gener
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 5:15pm EST
and politicians need that have been and the important thing is this is america's city a doherty has a stake in the city, every becomes here, belongs them and this comes about. >> one of the things we do in the book there is very strange thing for example, the lincoln conspirators were hung in the famous photograph is now the place in which garfield was shot on his way back to the williams college reunion waiting for the building on the mall. a little tiny markers about as big as a trustee that says this is where the president was shot, so part of this is discovering this league history of the city and the and back to amazing things in the civil war. there's part of washington where abraham lincoln there's a battle in washington that the confederate troops are approaching the city and abraham lincoln stands up and they shoot at him and somebody says mr. president, and they pull him down. one of the problems of the battle of fort stevens is have the soldiers had to keep the citizens sightseers back from getting killed. this wildness that was here all along and was sort of limestone do
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 8:00pm EDT
. >> that will bring things to a close. the comment is buckle up america we're not going back to a gentler time but where we go, politics make us in a call which has a new platform to stand on and our commitment to civil discourse that we can make an impact if i think our panelists for being here and all of you for being here as well. [applause] the books will be available for citing in assigning area. just west of the student union. thank you very much. >> that concludes our coverage of the 2011 tucson of books. we have them live all weekend if you have missed any of the events that coverage will air tonight starting at 1:00 a.m. eastern. [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] [no audio] as it did to ship them across the atlantic. it was enormously difficult to access the wealth. there was a great transportation network, chicago, which was formed starting off on the illinois and michigan can now had a great wateree park rails only supplemented that transportation network every city and the major waterway for the river mead says c. whe
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 12:00am EDT
display ever seen and north america. generations of new yorkers commemorated november 25th as the evacuation day, an anniversary that was later folded into the more enduring november celebration of the national togetherness, thanksgiving day. but what if you hadn't wanted the british to leave? mixed in among the had the new york crowd that november day, there were other less cheerful faces. for loyalists, colonists who sided with britain during the war, the departure of the british troops felt worried, not jubilation. during the war, tens of thousands of loyalists moved for safety into new york and other british help cities. the british withdrawal now resurgent questions about their future. what kind of treatment could expect in the new united states? would they be jailed, would they be attacked, but they retain their property or hold onto their jobs? confronting real doubts about their lives, liberty and potential happiness in the united states, 60,000 loyalists decided to take their chances and follow the british elsewhere in to the british empire. they took 15,000 black
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 7:00am EDT
call the duck. it said, america now up for grabs, and it was referring to this concert that the rolling stones had in december of 1969. and this was supposed to have been a triumphant affair. they appeared with carlos santana and the jefferson airplane, and they had a hard time sort of finding a venue for this show at the last minute, so they did it at altamont speedway. and it turned out to be a disaster. thousands of people sort of clamored on top of each other to get close to the stage. someone had the bright idea of hiring the hell's angels motorcycle gang to do security, and they paid them, allegedly, with a truckload of beer. it was a really violent scene, so the hell's angels were brutalizing and beating up spectators and probably would have been less violent if rolling stones had played a little earlier. the concert was being filmed for a documentary called "give me shelter," which you probably are familiar with. anyhow, mick jagger was reluctant to play until it was dark because he thought it he wd look better under the stage lights. it was just a violent, ugly scene, and the r
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 4:00pm EDT
believe, and what i think america's priorities ought to be. part of the reason for writing the book was to let people have a clear insight so they will know on the front end. before i run and before they commit. and part of the purpose in the book was to say here i stand. martin luther was the one who nailed 95 thesis on the door in wittenberg. i'm not sure this is such significance. it isn't, of course, but it is to me an important document, a statement of conviction. and i think if one reads the book, you will find there are some things that i say that are not necessarily politically correct. i don't always follow the company line of the gop. there are some maybe more unorthodox points of view that you'll find. and i think you'll find an extraordinary level of canter in which i talk about things like social security and medicare. i want today to find of give a summary of some of the maybe salient points that i think are most critical in understanding what's in this book, why i wrote it, and then, of course, i'll be happy to answer your questions. i've always say in politics, we ca
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 5:15pm EDT
to the united states of america. the family has said if pakistan gives ramon davis back to the united states, they will all commit suicide one at a time. now that may all be a bluff, but there aren't a lot of government that is are going to call the citizens bluff on something like that. we have high drama, supply versus supply, -- spy versus spy, and it comes after a difficult relationship. the a cy office in the country was named in the pakistani press, he was outed. he had to be pulled out the country, literally at night. if that wasn't bad enough, "the new york times" and the "washington post" citing cia sources said he had been outed by the pakistani intelligence service, the interservice intelligence director at isi. now i've been engaged in liaison with foreign governments for many years. this is not normal behavior. we don't usually do this. we don't usually out each other, and then talk about it in the newspapers. since the arrest of mr. davis, the president has said very clearly is a diplomat and must be given diplomatic immunity. we have already canceled a trilateral afghanistan,
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 4:00pm EST
that you are always looking at how you can improve yourself and make your team better and for team america we need to be looking at what our economic policies, tax policies, energy, education policies which are mostly state, not federal, but what can we do to make sure everyone in america has that opportunity to compete and succeed, and i have a chapter in the book that we've been on the first down since the 1970's. those sports teams love to say we are number one, we are number one. well america is number one when it comes to energy resources things to our plentiful coal as well as gas and oil resources but the leaders in washington will get these resources as a curse. any other country would consider them a blessing so we need to unleash our resources and the resources of our creative people rather than continue to get jerked around by dictators, oligarchs and the cartel's. >> is the competition getting fierce between the team republican and team democrat? >> it has been the that's decided by the people. the fans decide who has the best idea. the fans get the vote depending on what the o
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 8:00am EDT
decline. it was common for all of america's older cities. one of the pains of this book is that the american dream doesn't have to lie behind a white picket fence in the suburb. and that cities have been as intrinsic to american history and to our experience as a nation as anyplace else. the very birth of american has its roots in boston in the 1770s between john hancock badly wanted the political change that could be created by a mob. and sam adams who knew how to conjure a mob. and their connections as created by the city of boston changed america, created, helped create this great country of ours. in the 19 century the great problem was making the wealth of the american interior accessible to the market to the east and europe. cities make that happen. they grew up as the great transportation network that enables the rich dark soil of iowa to become productive. if you go back to 1816 it costs us much to move goods 32 miles overland as it did to ship them across the atlantic. it was enormously difficult to access all the wealth that was in the american hinterland. citie
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 11:15am EDT
on the current state of politics here in america and presents his plan to simplify the government. he speaks at the national press club here in washington for about half an hour. >> so i want to thank you for coming today. i was almost late. i was detained for a few minutes, had a phone call from david koch and that lasted nearly 20 minutes. [laughter] but i was finally able to break loose and get here today to be with you. i do want to correct one thing, bob. i was actually not third in the republican primary, i was second. yeah, i want to get that -- that has been a story that is often told, so i've worked really hard to be second. not that it means a darn thing because when you come in second place, there is no prize. or third, or fourth. one of the realities of politics. i think all of you have a copy, at least i hope you do, of the book, "simple government: 12 things that we really need from washington and the trillion we don't," and i'm hope you have a chance to read it. i'm sure you'll stay up late tonight and read all 228 payments of it. -- pages of it. i truly hope at least you'll g
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 1:00am EDT
of deindustrialization. it was common for all of america's older cities. one of the themes for the book is that the american dream doesn't have to lie behind a white picket fence in the suburb, and that cities have been as intrinsic for american history and our experiences in the nation as any place else. the very birth of america has roots in boston in the 1730s between john hancock who wanted the political change to be created by a mob and sam adams who like many proveighers of liquor could conjure a mob. [laughter] it changed america and helped create this great country of ours. in the 19th century, the great problem was making the wealth of the american exterior accessible to the markets of the east and europe. cities made that happen. they were a great transportation network that engaged the rich dark soil of iowa to be productive. it cost as much to move goods 32 miles over land as it did to ship them across the atlantic. it was difficult to access all the wealth in the american lands. cities grew up in modes of great transportation network, the chicago which was formed, started o
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 11:00pm EST
everybody to have a chance. and he knows in this world, the united states of america is a force for good. the american people, reagan said, are hopeful, big-hearted, idealistic, daring, decent, and fair. he was all of these things himself. and everyone could see that. we can all think of leaders throughout history who had qualities of greatness but came up a little short in the qualities of goodness. and somehow, when we remember this great man, we think of his goodness. >> he was engaged in the biggest events of his time, the kindness, and courtesy were never, ever beneath him. just the way he carried himself, that confident, gentlemanly manner. all class. and in hollywood, you can't even fake that. sometimes the best tributes come from opponents because they're the ones looking for weaknesses, and it was a notable adversary who said of president reagan, a large yes of spirit infused his presidency. he lifted our vision and enlarged our conception of this nation and its mission on earth. his time will long glow in history and in memories. that was pretty high praise coming as it did fro
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 9:00am EDT
because she believed that her government would not stand up to the united states of america. the family has subsequently said that if pakistan gives raymond davis back to the united states, they will all commit suicide one at a time. now, that may all be a bluff, but there aren't a lot of governments in the world who are going to call their own citizens' bluff on a threat like that. we have high drama, we have spy versus spy, and it comes after an increasingly difficult relationship over the last several months. in december the cia's chief of station in islamabad, the highest cia officer in the country, was named in the pakistani press, what we refer to he was outed. he had to be pulled out of the country, literally, overnight. if that wasn't bad enough, "the new york times" and "the washington post" citing cia sources on background said he'd been outed by the pakistani intelligence service, the interservice's intelligence directorate corps, isi. s this not -- this is not normal behavior. we don't usually do this, we don't usually out each other and talk about it in the newspapers. sinc
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 10:00pm EST
-building based on a social contract. that was that the united states of america would give to the people money and as much security as we could. and in return we expected them to turn against the taliban and all we wanted was them to tell us who was to read -- taliban because they were wearing civilian clothes we don't speak pashtun we don't know who was about to shoot me but if you help me i will take care of the mafia. that was the deal and the social contract that underlaid everything we have been doing for 10 years. i will show you what happened. we had something called tribal loyalty. look at this picture. this was 500 meters outside of a battalion base and for four years the italians that rotated through tried to say to the people what do you want? we will help you occasionally there were snipers shot in could not always persuade people. a year and a half ago they said the american and italian commander who was kind dispirited said i will help you with your mosque. and as we were driving and and, these kids were 12 or 13, coming out on the road as fast as we were going yen, and these wer
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 8:00pm EDT
of make in america really one for every one. so johnson would not have been my topic of choice. i read about that era because i had to but it wouldn't be something -- i've never thought i would have actually studied it and actually write something about it. but i got a phonecall one morning from arthur schlesinger jr., telling me that i was going to be getting a letter from him and sort of talking in general and i did get this letter from him in which he asked me to write the biography of andrew johnson for the american president period which is a very nice series, very short concise book about american presidents. they get people -- sometimes to actually fit like george appleby and thomas jefferson but gary hart did a book, george mcgovern did lincoln i think so there were sort of the mix of historians and non-historians, looking at these presidencies, telling the basic stories but also giving your own sort of individual spin on it. and he asked me to do the johnson book and i guess he figured i would put my individual spin on it. i agreed to do it because arthur asked me to do it and
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 2:00pm EST
of making america really one for everyone. so johnson would not have been my topic of choice. i read about the area because they have to, but it would not be something i thought i would ever actually study and write very much about it. i got a phone call one morning from arthur schlesinger junior, telling me i was going to be getting a letter from him and talking just in general. i did get this letter in which he asked me to write the biography of andrew johnson for the american presidents series, which is a very nice series, a short concise book about american presidents. and they gave people a sort of -- well, sometimes you fit, someone like george b., of course she is a great jefferson scholar as kerry hard to debug, george mcgovern did begin. and so there's a mix of historians and non-historians, looking at this president is, telling the basic story, but also giving your own individual spin on it. and he asked me to do this to the johnson both. i guess he figured i would put my individual spin on it. i agreed to do it because arthur asked me to do it and i have great respect for him. i
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 8:00am EST
was that the united states of america would give to the people money and as much security as we could. in money we give about $14 billion a year. and in return we expected them to turn against the taliban. and all we really wanted them to do more than anything else was just tell us who among them was the taliban. because since everyone is wearing civilian clothes and we don't speak pashtun, we have no idea who among you is about to shoot me. but if you help me and point out who the mafia is among you, i'll take care of the mafia for you. that was the deal. that was the social contract that underlay everything we've been doing for ten years. and i'll show you what happened. you had something called tribal loyalty. look at this picture. this is a place called that was 500 meters outside a base, and for four years the battalions who rotated through that base what do you want, we'll help you, and occasionally you'd get sniper shots. they were never able to persuade the people. so about a year and a half ago they said, well, the american battalion commander who was really kind-spirited said i'll come i
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 9:00am EST
america, but britain, too. >> well, their comprehension of the political situatio >> their comprehension of the situation was that the problem was not just there's. it corrupted the parliament, and absolute power. but the people at home in the british isles were also affected by this. i traced per the efforts have across the sea efforts, american radicals, the bill of rights, to support the radical jobs bill. that correspondence existed was a surprise to me. when i first discovered it was when i was a graduate student writing a seminar paper and basically the book followed the dissertation from that discovery that was very interesting crossing the correspondent. >> who was john wilkes and why do you call him a radical? >> john wilkes was an opponent of the british government. he argued for greater political rights. he was worried about the corruption of parliament. he criticized the king for period of time over this. and his struggle, parallel events happening in america at the same time. it was four times, elected by the freeholders of middlesex county and he was thrown out on the left
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 7:00pm EST
the country. he wants everyone to have a chance, and he knows that in this world the united states of america is a force for good. the american people are hopeful, a big heart, idealistic, daring, decent and fair. he was all of these things himself and everyone could see that. we can all think of leaders throughout history who had qualities of greatness that came up a little short in the quality of goodness and saw how when we remember this great man, we think of his goodness. he was engaged in the biggest defense of his time, the kindness and courtesy or never beneath him. it's just the way he carried himself, that confident manner. he was all class coming and in hollywood you can't even fix that. [laughter] sometimes the best tributes come from opponents because they are the ones as you know, are looking for witnesses and was a notable adversary who once said of president reagan the spirit and used his presidency. ronald reagan was one of those rare presidents who lifted our vision and enlarge our conception of this nation and its mission on earth. his time will glow in history and memory.
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 3:00pm EST
to america and became the physician to the president of the united states. her example is truly one of a woman whose achievements were unlimited in the military, medicine and government service. secondly, gloriafelt will speak, and gloria is a leading activist, a best selling author of four books, a commentator, a sought after after speaker on topics such as women, politics, power, health and can the media. her front line experience as to how to unlock intention and ambition in order to embrace the power to make a difference about what we believe in is, truly provides her with a unique perspective, and she shares that in her book, "no excuses: nine ways women can change the way we think about power." she's currently a professor at arizona state, and previously, and i know a lot of people in this room know her and we're very excited to have her return to ads, because she brought -- arizona, because she brought phenomenal growth to the planned parenthood affiliates in west texas and arizona. she was also the president and ceo of the planned parenthood federation of america from 1996 t
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 7:00pm EST
the national federation of independent business, the health insurance association of america have made themselves, in effect, political parties. but they're not parties that have a broad platform and they don't have a broad membership. they have a narrow platform reflecting the interests of their particular constituencies. but they do everything now that political parties do. they run media campaigns, harry and louise on the health insurance association of america. it's a brilliantly effective media campaign. they have their own field organizations. indeed, nfib -- federation of independent business -- had more people out working the grassroots than either the republican party or the democratic party had working on the health-care fight. they have become full-service political parties and we need to understand that if we're going to be serious about talking on what would constitute political reform in this day and age. c-span: you know, we start off talking about the teleprompter at that speech. and in the middle of your book you talk about a fellow by the name of larry o'donnell and t
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 4:30pm EDT
-old from ming china or a 26-year-old and america. in fact, most people in their 20s were not single and if they were, they were not living with roommates in williamsburg, brooklyn or dupont circle and drinking shots of mimosas with other pre-adults on weekends. they were married and they had children and they often had cars whose oil needed changing. now let's look at the numbers. in 1970 the average age of marriage for men was 23. and for women, a little less than 21. today, it is 26 and 28 but that is a little bit misleading actually. because the numbers for college-educated and even those with some graduate school education are considerably higher. for women, the average age is about 27. for women with a masters or professional degree, it is about 30. now this means that we have a historically high percentage of single people in their 20s and early 30s. this gives you a little bit of an idea. now, unlike almost any other decade we are looking at here, the majority of 25-year-olds are single. i wasn't able to get a chart on 30-year-olds, but the trends are the same. an ever-increa
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 8:00pm EDT
. the headlines said stone's concert ended. in the subheadline beneath that, it said america now up for grabs. it was referring to the concept of the rolling stones, a concert they had in the summer of 1969. this was supposed to be a triumphant appearance. they peered with the jefferson airplane and the flying burrito brothers, and they had a hard time finding a venue for the show, so they did it at the raceway. they built a stage that was three feet high, and it was a disaster. thousands of people clam moried on tom of each other to get close to the stage. someone hired the hell's angels motorcycle gang to do security, and they paid them with a truckload of beer, and so the hell's angels showed up with knives, and it was a violent scene. they beat up spectators and would have been less violent if they played earlier. they -- the concert was being filmed for a documentary, but mcjager, he was reluck at that particular time to play -- reluctant to play until it was dark. by every account, bad vibes were there, and it was an ugly scene. there were commotions around them, they are nor vows and w
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 4:15pm EST
his absolutely horrible and obscene comments about jews, about america. this book is not a memoir of myself in any way, shape or form. i am practically invisible other than the piece where i met with him in the cedar tavern. i am hardly in the book. this is bobby's story. it is bobby's life. it is great honesty of what he went through, truly a rags to we ended up before he died, multi-billion air. it has shakespearean overtones and it is truly the stuff of greek legend. that is about all i have to say. let's have a q&a. [applause] remember, wait until the microphone comes around. how are you today? >> at the end of his life where did he get his money? >> in 1992 he violated sanctions than the united states had against serbia. he played in montenegro and ended up, with a $5 billion match and he ended up winning $3.5 million and lived on that. >> wasn't most of it -- >> how are you? >> wasn't most of that swindled by the serbian banker -- >> absolutely not. there was a million dollars in television rights that bobby never got. but for tree$.5 million he definitely got it in cash. hi
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 7:00am EDT
america, and they ride the train.co a and they're not in the club car. they're riding on top of the train or on the side of theridi train. and we have stories about this in our book. and katherine tells a story about people riding on the side of the train. one of margaret's stories in margaret's book talks about argr pregnant woman who rode on the side of the train. so there are a lot of injuries there, but then there are a lots of medical problems as well because dehydration is the number one medical issue we see in the desert. we see people with severe blisters, and when you talk about misters, it's not like you've hiked five miles and got a bad blister on the back of your heel. these are like burns. so all of these medical problems kept unfolding, and as i have been with the samaritans now since 2002, i feel like i've been able to continue my medical expertise and continue my medical practice in a new way. p >> yeah, thank you. ted, let's hear from you. i'm making some assumptions here, but anyway,.coming out of the -- coming out of thehere restaurant business with i would imagine you'
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 1:00pm EDT
the power and the influence is spread around. fred said, huffington post, $315 million according to america online? the daily beast bought "newsweek," not the other way around. a two-year-old web site bought "newsweek." we live in a very different media culture. there's no more walter cronkite who could say, in february of 1968, that he went over to vietnam and looked at it and decide it was unwinnable, and within two weeks public opinion went from 60 something -- 64-of 5% in support of the war to about 40% in support of the war. because of one man. 25%. i've looked at the gallup numbers. it's very stark. it's also around the time of the tet offense simple. i think we can credit cronkite more than not. there's no more media culture like that. so in a sense, the "times" is -- i wouldn't say one among many equals because i think it's still obviously the leading newspaper in the united states. but it has to share a lot more -- has to share the atmosphere, the oxygen, with a lot more outlets than it ever used to, and that oxygen is much more contested now, and the whole media landscape is much
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 2:45pm EDT
with you, chas, and i forget to tell you the name of his book "america's misadventures in the middle east." which there are quite a few. >> more there should be. as bill mentioned i spent 30 years in the service of the united states as a diplomat, and during that period was very careful to avoid the middle east, finally it caught up with me, and i arrived in saudi arabia at an exciting time. in many ways this book, "america's misadventures in the middle east." the title explains the content. it's about how we got to the sorry pga -- sorry path in which we find ourselves. this is a series of essays and speeches which provide a realtime look at what was happening and what i thought was going wrong and unfortunately more often than not i proved to be all too prescient. so, book starts, as bill mentioned, with my experience in the gulf war, where i was very, very determined, if i had anything to do with it, to ensure that general william sherman's definition of the purpose of war was applied. he said, war -- the purpose of war is to produce a more perfect peace. i failed completely. there was
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2011 12:00am EST
with the new routers and a firmer establishment. and thereby save not only america. >> guest: the decade before independence butthe there was a problem inthe britain that they were corrected with the parliament and moving toward absolute power.lute nudges the american space but the people at home in the british isles were also affected. although across the sea ever.ndmed and with the bill of rights formed overheard john wilkes although with then existence, when i first discovered it i was a graduate student for a teeing a similar paper hot.erta that dissertation followed from the discovery of the cross semantic correspondence. >> host: who is johnos wilkes and why is the>> radical?e >> an opponent to thego british government andrgue argued for greater politicalhe w rights with the corruption of parliament and also criticized the came and went into exile for a period of time and an interesting development his struggle hap that was help happening and america the freeholders of middlesex county and nonetheless but americans weredly concerned they hadconc reason to think the problem just there the
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 11:00pm EDT
read about it. [laughter] in the 1980's, everyone in america it seemed was terrified of japan. the japanese had brought other high-profile things like that and if you mentioned some of that in your book. but japan ink disappeared and now we are sort of waiting for japan to be one of these dominoes because the debt is 200% of gdp. it's just government debt. is china the new japan? are we overstating what the0g0gg >> guest: i would say the realpg answer is idled because if i knew i would have treated thatpg already. >> guest: they have issues around demographics, but i think the fact of the matter in which the government is dealing with these things i think bodes well in that they are sort of playing a chess game, multiple moves ahead of most policymakers around the world. >> host: we have five minutes left. let's focus on solutions that our u.s. audience might not be interested in. you mentioned the housing crisis, and when i think of the housing crisis, it makes me very pessimistic. i read your book, and i like to think we basically have the government to the federal reserve w
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 11:15am EDT
-- their exchange was the more legitimate entity than the america. merc. i think there was always that attitude that the merc was the second-rate exchange down the street. >> we were just talking to somebody before this that said the merc was the juvenile exchange. that was the nickname for the merc. did you have a nickname for the board? >> not that i recall. >> you're very polite. >> i was fortunate that, you know -- actually, my father had memberships at both exchanges, and he actually had his office in the board of trade building. and i think even though he pro dominantly traded -- predominantly traded mercantile exchange products, he always liked the board of trade better. in fact, he had encouraged me to go to work at the board instead of the many merc. he said it was a more civilized place. >> can and why did you end up at the merc? >> i think part of it was just youthful rebellion. [laughter] and that's, honestly, why i think when i started in the business i didn't want to trade agricultural products. i was really exciteed about the new financial futures markets, and i felt, ultimately,
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 7:00pm EST
this report, if i've lost cronkite, i've lost middle america. and there's a great power in that story because if you're a journalist, it's really something to say, wow, i wrote a story or i did a report, and suddenly administration policy changed, you know? is i disheartened the president, or i moved things on a grand scale. journallests love that story. but -- journalists love that story. but, again, is it true? probably not. the images that we get from that time are that the american people turned against the war, and you had protests in the streets and so forth. one really entering thing i found -- one really interesting thing i found from the study was you look back at the polls, and looking at the people who supported the war by age group, actually the group that most supported johnson's policies and supported the war were young people. isn't that interesting? i found this in gallup poll, harris poll and in internal lighthouse polling, that young people were actually more supportive of the war. you'll never get that from the cultural representations of the time, you know, the forest gump
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 12:00pm EST
rulers and a firmer establishment of basic rights and there by save not only america, but britain, too. >> well, their comprehension of the political situation, for the greater part of t the period, t decade before independence, the problem was not just theirs, there was a problem in britain. the ministry had corrupted the parliament, and that they were moving toward absolute power and it was not just the american fate but that of the people at home in the british isles were also affected by this. so, there were -- but a traced the efforts, at the hands across the sea efforts, the correspondence of american radicals with people in britain, like the bill of rights, which was formed to support the radical john wilkes. and, that correspondence existed when the great -- it was a great surprise to me when i first discovered it was when i was a graduate student, writing a seminar paper and, basically the book followed -- the dissertation of the book followed from that discovery and, the interesting cross-atlantic correspondence. >> who was john wilkes and why do you call him a radical. >> we
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 11:00am EST
of america today? >> guest: it is critical. david does a wonderful job of describing washington's crossing, and they all say they couldn't have been standing up. he says they were standing up because there was a couple inches of slush in the bottom, and this was the boat used for ferrying across the river, and you stood up i guess. yes, the importance of princeton is part of the most important. december 7 and then early january, 1776 and then january 1777. it looked like the whom revolutionary resistance that the cause of the continue -- continental was unraveling. they lost in manhattan. washington was retreating, crosses the delaware, recrosses it, and those two victories, minor though they may seem on the scale of great military victories at least stopped the downward spiral and through that winter as well as david fisher explains well, they reclaimed territory and put the british on the defensive. it really was a turning point in the part of the war. on the other hand, you know, if you say what if the army had been defeated? what would have happened? well, we have the story in the sout
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 10:00am EDT
to the campaign and i found myself stuck in the detroit airport awaiting a flight delay on america's least glamorous flight detroit to buffalo. i went into a bookstore, audacity of hope, dreams of my father. there were obama coffee table book. it was like the obama store and so i bought a copy of dreams for my father and given my bias, like an adolescent buying his first copy of the playboy you don't have the national review and the commentary but anyhow, as i started reading the book, first of all i discovered that the excerpts in question were taken out of question. the book is not as radical as it sounds at all. the book was very calculated. the book was not calculated to make president of the united states. the book was calculated to make barack obama the mayor of chicago in which position he would do the world good as president. he presents a world of, you know, psychological and moral problems. as i got into it, just in the way of description, the book is divided into three parts. the first part starts with a section called origin which basically tells his story from the time even wh
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 7:00pm EDT
attention to the campaign, and i found myself stuck in the detroit airport awaiting a flight on america's least glamorous flight the trip to buffalo. but very little to do i went into a bookstore and was like and obamarama. dreams from my father, softcover, there were obama coloring books and coffee table books giving it was like the obama store. and given my diocese i feel like an adolescent boy in the first copy of playboy. you don't have the "national review" and commentary but anyhow, as i started reading the book first of all i discovered the excerpts in question were taken out of context. the book is not as radical as it sounds. the book is calculated and as i would learn later on doing my research the book wasn't calculated to make barack obama president of the united states. was calculated to make barack obama the mayor of chicago in which position it would do a world of good as president and in the world of psychological and moral problems. as i get into it, just in the we've description, the book is divided into three parts. the first part starts with the section origins, whic
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